Nymans Revisited


Today the weather allowed us to go back to Nymans in West Sussex. It is just over 50 miles from and easy to get to. Mostly the drive is motorway driving. Even though it wasn’t supposed to rain, the clouds loomed, and was quite dismal. I will say this now…in a few of the images I’ve replaced the sky.

The thing I wanted to photograph so much was The Temple… unfortunately, there were too many people there and I’ve could have stood there all day and still not get a shot of the Temple without people. I’ve never known Nymans to be so packed with visitors. I suppose a lot of that could be that they were having a pumpkin hunt on for the kids and today was the first day.

Tree lined walk Nymans
A photograph of the tree-lined walk at Nymans in West Sussex on an autumn’s day.

Camera Settings

Camera: Canon EOS 600D
Lens: Canon EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
F/Number: f/7.1
ISO: 100
Focal Distance: 27 mm

Shutter Speed: 1/13 sec
Photograph Date: 23.06.2013
Location: Eltham Palace in London
Photographer: Bren
Software: Adobe Lightroom Classic


Every visit we did before we always started out in a different direct, which gave us another view of the tree-lined walk. In fact, I turned around and face the direction from which I came for the above photo. The leaves were turning brown and falling to the ground… giving it that extra special autumn feel.

Camera Settings

Camera: Canon EOS 70D
Lens: Canon EF-S18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS
F/Number: f/6.3
ISO: 100
Focal Distance: 18 mm

Shutter Speed: 1/25 sec
Photograph Date: 22.10.2022
Location: Nymans in West Sussex
Photographer: Ash
Software: Adobe Lightroom Classic


On a freezing winter’s night in 1947, their cherished horticultural library of international significance went up in flames, as did a Velasquez painting that hung in the library. Luckily no one was injured. With typical resilience the family set about turning tragedy to opportunity, focusing again on nurturing the garden with the romantic ruins at its heart. Their legacy was one of hope, experimentation and creativity, still evident today in the stunning grade II* listed garden displaying one of the most significant plant collections in the UK.

National Trust

Even though the building has never been restored, I have to say the fire ruins add character to the whole place… The ruins have their own charm and beautiful in their own right.

A photograph of the ruins at Nymans in West Sussex.

Camera Settings

Camera: Canon EOS 70D
Lens: Canon EF-S18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS
F/Number: f/6.3
ISO: 100
Focal Distance: 60 mm

Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec
Photograph Date: 22.10.2022
Location: Nymans, West Sussex
Photographer: Ash
Software: Adobe Lightroom Classic and ON1 Photo RAW 2023


The above image is photographed from the front of the of the main house entrance.

Some of the places were closed off, for winter… and again, that stopped me from taking a proper photograph of the little stone building by the sunken garden.

As we headed back towards the entrance, we walked through the formal gardens. And there still in bloom was beautiful coloured dahlias.

I just love the white dahlia, with the tinge of mauve on the ends of its petals.

All in all, we had a great day. And I have plenty of more images to process.

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9 responses to “Nymans Revisited”

  1. Beautiful flowers and photos. Love the autumn pathway!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. 🤗💖🙌🏼🤗🥰

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely photos Bren! I like the pathway especially.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. These are lovely images, but I think here, colour wins out over B/W.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you .. I’ve just added the coloured version to compare with the monochrome version.

      Liked by 1 person

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